MRI Abdomen benefits risks

  • MRI is a non-invasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation.
  • MR images of the soft-tissue structures of the body—such as the liver and many other organs— is more likely in some instances to identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many focal lesions and tumours.
  • MRI is proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, vascular disease, and muscular and bone abnormalities.
  • It enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods.
  • It allows physicians to assess the biliary system non-invasively and without contrast injection.
  • The examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed.
  • If sedation is used, there are risks attached to excessive sedation. The Radiographer or Nurse monitors your vital signs (pulse rate, temperature, breathing and blood pressure) to minimize this risk.
  • Although the strong magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI examination.
  • Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication of MRI believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a contrast injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication.
  • There is a very slight risk of an allergic reaction if contrast material is injected. Such reactions are usually mild and easily controlled by medication. If you experience any symptoms of an allergic reaction, a Radiologist or other Physician will be available for immediate assistance.
  • High-quality images are assured only if you are able to remain perfectly still and follow instructions for holding your breath while the images are being recorded. If you are anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging.
  • A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines.
  • The presence of an implant or other metallic object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect.
  • Breathing may cause artifacts, or image distortions, during an MRI of the abdomen and pelvis. Bowel motion is another source of motion artifacts in abdomen and pelvic MRI studies. 
  • Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the foetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI examination during the first trimester unless medically necessary.
  • MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as oedema.
  • MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities.