Fundus Fluorescein Angiogram

Fluorescein angiography is a diagnostic procedure which photographs the retina - the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

This test is used to diagnose certain eye conditions, to determine and plan treatment.

Common conditions requiring fluorescein angiography include macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular disease. In some cases, the angiography may be repeated to monitor your response to treatment or changes in an eye condition.

The Procedure

This test takes only a short time, causes little discomfort and needs no special preparation.

A dye is used to highlight the blood vessels at the back of the eye. Your eyes will be dilated with eye drops and you will be seated in front of a special camera. The dye is usually injected into a vein in your arm or hand.

A few seconds later, as the dye reaches the vessels at the back of your eye, a series of photographs are quickly taken.

There is no permanent effect on your vision from having the test done.

Following The Procedure

After the test, you can go back to normal daily activities.

Sometimes the dye makes your skin look yellow and your urine orange for a day or two after the test. These effects are temporary and harmless.

There is no permanent effect on your vision from having the test done.